doctorswithoutborders:

Photo 2013 © Sven Torfinn
Right now, many major drug companies’ business practices keep their own profits high while keeping medicines out of the hands of millions of people who need them. Until we change the way medicines are developed and marketed, too many people will go without needed treatment because quality medicines are not available to them.SHARE THIS IMAGE to show you stand with Doctors Without Borders in calling for access to quality, affordable medical treatment for ALL.

doctorswithoutborders:

Photo 2013 © Sven Torfinn

Right now, many major drug companies’ business practices keep their own profits high while keeping medicines out of the hands of millions of people who need them. Until we change the way medicines are developed and marketed, too many people will go without needed treatment because quality medicines are not available to them.

SHARE THIS IMAGE to show you stand with Doctors Without Borders in calling for access to quality, affordable medical treatment for ALL.

Trigeminal Nerve Inferno

chroniccurve:

image

You cried today. You cried, hard, and you know that anything more than a few tears will mean a full blown attack of trigeminal nerve pain. A disease so shitty that it robs you of the ability to shed tears, no matter how justified they might be. With the first twinge, you medicate. Whatever…

gaksdesigns:

Artist Zaria Forman

Soft Pastel on Paper

(via fyeahwomenartists)

He who has no manners has no knowledge; he who has no patience has no Deen, and he who has no piety has no nearness to Allaah for him.

al-Hasan al-Basri - rahimahullah (via poeticislam)

Anonymous asked: Who are you to give out advice to other students on how to study and do well?

chroniccurve:

Someone that took a year long medical leave from school, failed six classes, battled serious infections, med changes, three surgeries, crippling anxiety, a handful of painful diseases, and changed my major three times before figuring out what I wanted from university and how to get a 4.0 this semester in spite of my challenges.

So why would I not share the tools that got (and are currently getting me) through classes with someone else that’s struggling? It won’t help everyone, but it might help someone. That’s enough for me.

Whoever has tawakkul (trust, complete reliance) in Allah, Allah will be with him, and whoever has Allah with him, he will be with the Team that is never defeated; the Guard that never goes to sleep; the One whom sleep never overtakes; the Guide who will never lead you astray.

Qatadah (rahimahullah)

(Source: poeticislam)

nprglobalhealth:

Popping A Baby Out Like A Cork, And Other Birth Innovations

An invention to help with obstructed labor has turned some heads — and not just because the idea came from a party trick on YouTube.

The Odon Device, created by Argentine car mechanic Jorge Odon, guides a folded plastic sleeve around the baby’s head. A little bit of air is then pumped between the two plastic layers, cushioning the baby’s head and allowing it to be sucked out. This trick for removing a cork from an empty wine bottle works the same way.

The device has been embraced by the World Health Organization and is being developed by the global medical technology company BD. Once clinical trials are done, the WHO and individual countries will have to approve it before it’s sold. BD hasn’t said how much it will charge, but each one is expected to cost less than $50 to make.

"If proven safe and effective," a 2011 presentation on Odon’s invention said, “the Odon Device will be the first innovation in operative vaginal delivery since the development of forceps centuries ago and vacuum extractor decades ago.”

The Odon device shows that “good ideas can come from anyone and anywhere,” says Wendy Taylor, director of USAID’s Center for Accelerating Innovation and Impact.

If you’re in the business of innovating, she says, there’s no need to strive for mechanical complexity. Some of the biggest breakthroughs are cheap and simple. And, she says, the strategy for scaling something up for worldwide use “is just as important as the innovation itself.”

One of the crowning innovations in preventing death during childbirth was convincing doctors to wash their hands in between handling corpses and delivering babies. And many argue that fancier tools are just part of a tradition of unnecessary interference that circumvented the best tool in the box: gravity.

With that in mind, here are five ideas that struck us as innovative and surprising (some more likely to succeed than others):

1. Ready Yet?

A team at the University of California, San Francisco created a “cervical cap" to check whether a woman is about to go into labor. The device can detect changes in the collagen of the cervix. The softening of collagen as the cervix opens is a telltale sign a baby’s on its way. Information from the cap’s sensors can be transmitted to a nearby cellphone, which can send the data to a doctor. The device can be inserted briefly once a day, without a professional’s help.

2. Back To Basics

A team at Massachusetts General Hospital developed a uterine balloon kit to stop postpartum hemorrhage. It consists of a condom tied to a catheter. Water from the catheter fills the condom in the uterus, creating pressure that can stop the bleeding. The kit has been tested successfully in South Sudan and Kenya. A similar tool in the U.S. can cost more than $300 each, Mass General says, compared with less than $5 each for the simple balloon kit.

Continue reading.

Top Drawing: The Odon Device was inspired by a YouTube video about how to remove a cork from the inside of a wine bottle. (Courtesy of the Odon Device)

Bottom Drawing: A ”cervical cap" detects changes in the collagen of the cervix to determine if a baby’s on its way. Information from the cap’s sensors can be transmitted to a nearby cellphone, which can send the data to a doctor. (Courtesy of UCSF)

(via articulomortis)

doctorswithoutborders:

Photo by Wendy Marijnissen
5-year-old Umeda is undergoing arduous treatment for drug-resistant TB in Tajikistan. She gets a gold star every day when she takes her medicine. http://bit.ly/1dq2zSb

doctorswithoutborders:

Photo by Wendy Marijnissen

5-year-old Umeda is undergoing arduous treatment for drug-resistant TB in Tajikistan. She gets a gold star every day when she takes her medicine. http://bit.ly/1dq2zSb

poeticislam:

"Knowledge knocks on the door of action. If it receives a reply, it stays, otherwise it departs."
-Sufyaan ath Thawri (rahimahullah)

poeticislam:

"Knowledge knocks on the door of action. If it receives a reply, it stays, otherwise it departs."

-Sufyaan ath Thawri (rahimahullah)

Poetic Islam: Katheer ibn Qais reported: We were sitting with Abu Ad-Darda in the...

poeticislam:

Katheer ibn Qais reported: We were sitting with Abu Ad-Darda in the mosque of Damascus when a man came and he said,“O Abu Ad-Darda, I have come to you from Medina, the city of the Messenger of Allah, for a tradition narrated to you from him.” He said,“Verily, I heard the Messenger of Allah, peace…